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PostPosted: Sat Jul 11, 2020 5:22 pm 
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When I did my engine conversion the fuel trims were adding fuel, it turned out to be a tiny little exhaust leak in the 4-2-1 extractors, the O2 sensor was seeing a leaner mixture and adding more fuel than required as a result of air that had come in via the hole. As you've just had the exhaust done the same might be happening to you...

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 11, 2020 6:37 pm 
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fuzzy-hair-man wrote:
When I did my engine conversion the fuel trims were adding fuel, it turned out to be a tiny little exhaust leak in the 4-2-1 extractors, the O2 sensor was seeing a leaner mixture and adding more fuel than required as a result of air that had come in via the hole. As you've just had the exhaust done the same might be happening to you...


Ah yep that would do it. I'm not running an O2 sensor or any wideband sensor for that matter so far. I might add one later if I have trouble getting a good tune across the range!

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2020 10:20 am 
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I haven't had too much time in the shed lately but I've had a few questions as to how this build is progressing so I thought I'd put an update together.

The K1100 fuel rail and the stock FPR arrived and once this was fitted, the car ran and idled beautifully with the base map and fuel settings which is a good feeling after initially suspecting that the erratic fuel pressure was causing the issues. I haven't had much time to play with it beyond this 30 second run, but in a few weeks time I should be back in the shed and getting it sorted out.

I'm not going to use the stock K1100 inline FPR (cant quite see it in the below photo) - instead I have an adjustable aeroflow one. It'll likely need the fuel lines to be rerouted under the car to keep it neat in the engine bay and I'll also have to sort out a custom bracket to mount it somewhere close to the rail.

I've also fitted some K&N pod filters (KNRU 2310 for those who want the same) and I'm pretty happy with how they fit and look - although the temp sensor on the thermostat housing rubs on the filter - I'll likely need to change some coolant hoses to fix this up.

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In other news I have finally received my new gauges after 3 months in the post from NVU in the US. Pretty stoked with how these look. My plan is to recreate a 2 Pod instrument housing to mimic the original one, albeit slightly bigger to maintain the restomod theme and accommodate for the slightly larger gauges than the stock ones. Unsure what material to make it out of - either acrylic or MDF.... any opinions would be greatly appreciated. I think I will paint it with spray on bedliner to get the texture of the original instrument housing too.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2020 1:34 pm 
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Gosh they are stunning gauges...
acrylic or steel with crinkle paint would be my suggestion :P

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2020 7:16 pm 
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Fuel pressure regulator installed in the most practical location I could find. The more I add to the engine bay the more I appreciate the guys that have done this conversion in a morris. Space is at a premium that's for sure. Despite this FPR, I kept having flooding issues with the plugs fouling and the pistons being covered in fuel and not being able to start the engine. Turns out you can't use MAP as the fuel load reference for an engine that has ITBs which is what was causing this issue for me. Throttle Position Sensor has to be used instead - easy enough to sort out but will change a large part of how this engine is tuned.

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After ordering seats from Oz.Minisport in Feb, they finally arrived and I got time to install them. These took way too much modification to fit for something labeled as "Mini". Without any modification to the seat mount brackets, the amount of recline on the seats was pretty outrageous. Needless to say that the grinder had a much bigger part to play in fitting these seats than I anticipated - happy with the results though.

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Gauges. Very pleased with how this dashboard turned out noting the theme I was after to somewhat copy the original. I'm yet to wire it in - that's a tomorrow job. Working with acrylic was a lot better than I anticipated. bending it was quite easy with a few blocks of wood to concentrate the heat from a hot hair dryer on the crease line for about 5 minutes each side. A bench sander also made life easier. Duplicolor Bed Armour spray paint best mimicked the texture that the original instrument housing has.

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Some rare earth magnets hidden behind the felt make for an inconspicuous phone holder that worked surprisingly well. There is a credit card shaped very thin piece of sheet metal hiding between the phone and the phone case that secures the phone a little better to the magnets.

Next up is tuning the engine. Newcastle Engine tuners have opted to steer clear of even attempting to tune this engine which opens up an opportunity for me to take some online courses and learn to do this myself. Besides - A series are quite tough - I just won't rev the nuts off it until I've really dialed it in and got it on a dyno to understand where the power is. High Performance Academy have some really good online courses that I've learnt plenty from already.

Not long till this is on the road now. Wire in gauges. Tune. drive.

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-1976 Yellow Devil Leyland Clubman-
-1968 Morris Mini 850-


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2020 8:44 am 
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Love yer work :!: 8)

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 18, 2020 9:35 am 
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jpodge wrote:
It's about time for an update, and like many it's been a busy last few weeks in the shed. First on the list of to-do's was sort out the fuel system.

A return line would be needed for this injection setup and unfortunately the tank that was in the car was one that did not have a drain bung that I could tap into. I added one up the top in a position that I thought would cause least disturbance to the fuel float from fuel returning back in to the tank. I also lopped off the original feed tube as it was probably too small for this application. I added the same 1/4" BSPT screw in fitting to the bottom there. Silver soldered in by a radiator repair place.

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Fuel lines were run and the fuel pump and filters were installed on the rear subframe. I've since added rubber grommets to protect the fuel lines as they go up into the boot.

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(in this photo you can see an extra breather that I added that goes from the old dist hole to the filler neck -> catch can that you can see in some other photos mounted on the firewall)

I didn't think that a swirl pot/surge tank was really that necessary for this build. It'll be seen to be believed but if I needed to add one in, it would be relatively simple to plumb it in. Once the fuel tank was installed it all looked nice and neat.

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Ignition coils from a Toyota Yaris were recommended for me to use in the build and they fit the head pretty well and will be relatively easy to wire up (only requiring 3 out of the 4 pins to be used). I just needed to make up a mounting plate for them to keep them secure. Some aluminium flat stock cut, drilled and tapped to size did the trick.

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Starting the wiring was next and to start I decided to get rid of anything that I didn't need. All I really had to remove was the wire directly to the coil from the ignition switch, and the wire from the coil to the distributor. This turned out to be a more difficult job than I thought - largely because all of the wires were covered in 44 years of dirt and woo that made them all indistinguishable so a few hours was dedicated to sorting and cleaning all of the old stuff. I have found that the wiring diagrams in my Gregories manual for different variants of Clubmans are all similar, but none of them are exactly the same as the way my car is wired or the colour of the wires - there's not much evidence that my car wiring has been stuffed with in the past so I am at a loss to why some things are different. I still have one dark green wire that runs along the front side of the the engine bay that has two female spades on it about a meter apart that don't seem to go anywhere. It comes straight from the original fuse box. Spotlights maybe?

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It was only mildly daunting at this stage but things got a little more daunting once I added the wiring loom from the Haltech Elite 550 and fuse box into the engine bay.

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While it all looks like complete chaos, it is all relatively simple. once the wires were routed roughly where they needed to go, it was easy to see what I needed to wire up and what I didn't need in my application. All the wires hanging out of the drivers side of the car (with the exception of 3 or 4) won't be needed for me.

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The fuse box and ECU is mounted underneath the parcel shelf and is tucked away but still allows easy access to the USB connector for when tuning and access to the fuse/relay panel. Excuse the horribly ill fitting carpet!

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The ECU is quite small and fits there nicely. I am incredibly impressed with the quality of the Haltech stuff that I am using so far. the wiring harness is awesome and the fuse box and relay panel already comes ready to go with main and fuel pump relays. All I really have to do is terminate the wires I am using and reassign or remove the wires that I don't plan to use.

I will need to add an inlet air temp sensor but other than that, everything that is already installed on the mini engine should be enough to get the car running. Anything else (such as exhaust temp or really anything) is just an extra reference point for the ECU to either self tune or use as a reference for engine scheduling as the tuner sees fit.


Just wondering what fuel pump and filter did you end up using


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 19, 2020 1:53 pm 
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848cc
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9YaTaH wrote:
Love yer work :!: 8)


Thanks!

kiwiinwgtn wrote:

Just wondering what fuel pump and filter did you end up using


Aeroflow do an EFI kit with fuel hose, two inline filters (primary and secondary) and a fuel pump. It's definitely overkill at I think 450L/h and good for 600hp or something.


Bit of an update - I've spent heaps of time recently trying to get the engine running properly... Actually, let me go back a step - I've spent heaps of time trying to start the engine. Heaps of time in the order of four or so weeks to no reasonable avail.

After changing the tuning method to TPS vice MAP, I noticed that the fueling seemed to be correct and excessive fuel smell/fuel on the pistons following cranking was no longer evident. Even though, despite what seemed to be a much more reasonable fuel delivery, the engine would kick when cranking, but wouldn't catch and run.

The battery was about 6 years old and the walls of the battery starting to bulge. Thinking that voltage @ around 10.5V when cranking may be causing ECU scheduling issues, I upgraded to the biggest battery I could find that fitted in the battery box. Century NS70LX MF with 720 CCA should do the trick. No luck - no change of symptoms with the new battery but damn it cranks quick!!

Spark plugs. I suspected that the grade 8 plugs were perhaps a bit too hot. Changed them out for new NGK grade 7's and it started after a few hours of playing with ignition timing. It ran for about 10 minutes and I was able to tune base fuel map for that cell to run at 14.7 AFR. I noticed that idle was very susceptible to minor changes in ignition timing. Advancing the timing even 1' caused a change in idle speed of 300-450 rpm! Either way, I was happy that the engine was at least running until I saw that the temp was at 105'C after this point in time. No doubt some of you have noticed the absent radiator shroud which was no doubt the culprit of it overheating when idling. No one else to blame but myself for this one. New 4 core rad, stock fan and new shroud to fix that. After letting the engine cool for a few hours, tried to start it again and nothing. A few kicks here and there but no luck in getting it to run. Also - if you don't jack the engine up from the passenger side to change the radiator - you should try it it's amazing and negates the need for fingers like wet spaghetti - the radiator can have the shroud still bolted on and removed without any fouling issues against the fan. You probably all knew this but I didn't and now I do and it made me very happy. Cheers Matt!

Spark. I pulled every plug and confirmed that every coil was producing spark at the right time etc etc. Everything looked good. To ensure that the spark event was strong enough when cranking, I boosted the dwell time to achieve a brighter spark when cranking. No change. I am starting to think that these chinese copy ignition coils have already had their day as producing a spark outside of the engine is very different to producing a spark under 150 odd PSI of pressure (or whatever it may be - haven't tested compression yet). New genuine Bosch BIC729 coils are on the way. Yes - it's getting fuel and even with a few drops/spray down the intake didn't change the situation.

Cam timing. A key defining moment seemed to be getting the exhaust made up. Before that and with just header pipes on the engine ran fine to the point that I even drove the car up onto the tow truck bed on the way to the exhaust shop. I though I may as well pull the cam cover off and just make sure that the intake and exhaust cams weren't mixed up. pulling the cover, everything looked good and I checked the build guide to make sure I'd timed the cams properly. They were timed with roughly 3mm of lift on the intake and exhaust valves of cyl 4 while cyl 1 was at TDC. At this point I was suspicious that I was going crazy in all my troubleshooting. Took some snaps and sent them to Matt who recommended to try 1.5mm intake valve lift and 1.8mm exhaust lift instead of the ~3mm that it was currently at.

Adjusting the cam timing to close to these specs meant that the intake cam was advanced by two teeth on the belt and retarded by 1 tooth on the exhaust cam so it was a fairly substantial change. Yes I could have just used the adjustable cam pulleys without adjusting the timing belt but had I done that I would've been on the absolute extent of the available adjustment and I didn't really want that - I still want some adjustability close to what should be right!

To me, it makes sense as to why it ran pretty lumpy like this without an exhaust on - add some back pressure and it struggles to run at all - and also explains the susceptibility to minor ignition timing changes.

At the moment I am just about to head into the garage and dial this cam timing in to the right valve lift. Hopefully this combined with genuine coils should see this thing in a happy place. A huge thanks goes out once again to Matt Read for helping me out here - I cannot wait to drive this up to Brisbane and share the experience with you mate!

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-1976 Yellow Devil Leyland Clubman-
-1968 Morris Mini 850-


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2020 11:18 am 
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Joe, NGK plugs are higher the number the colder they are. I'm running 5's. I didn't go right back over the original posts, what size injectors are you running? IMO the haltech base map was not close and the ecu needs setting up. The mechanical thinks you are playing with sound like they were close enough to let it run.

By the look of your engine bay I don't know how it starts at all. Are these oldwer pic of the progress?

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2020 11:37 am 
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dalmeny wrote:
Joe, NGK plugs are higher the number the colder they are. I'm running 5's. I didn't go right back over the original posts, what size injectors are you running? IMO the haltech base map was not close and the ecu needs setting up. The mechanical thinks you are playing with sound like they were close enough to let it run.

By the look of your engine bay I don't know how it starts at all. Are these oldwer pic of the progress?


My bad Steve thanks for the info re spark plugs. The injectors are 200cc injectors at 3 bar. Given that I’ve been able to run the engine on the fuel map that’s currently loaded, it too should be close enough to get it to run but I’ll keep having a look at it.is there anyway that I could have a look at your map?

Check the latest photos that I’ve put up. Engine is complete and all the wiring is done etc etc

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-1968 Morris Mini 850-


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2020 12:18 pm 
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I was running (I think) 260cc injectors. Again it's been sometime since they went in, but I believe they were V6 Commodores. Now, since doing your TPS mod I have gone up to 370cc injectors. Runs a little bit rich at the moment but starts easier.

I don't know that my Microtech ecu map would have any relevance to a Haltec set up. Like you I have been trying to understand this ecu stuff what seems like ever. I had to find a Microtech tuner, you need a Haltec tuner who knows the system.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2020 3:14 pm 
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dalmeny wrote:
I was running (I think) 260cc injectors. Again it's been sometime since they went in, but I believe they were V6 Commodores. Now, since doing your TPS mod I have gone up to 370cc injectors. Runs a little bit rich at the moment but starts easier.

I don't know that my Microtech ecu map would have any relevance to a Haltec set up. Like you I have been trying to understand this ecu stuff what seems like ever. I had to find a Microtech tuner, you need a Haltec tuner who knows the system.


Fuel maps are comparable regardless of the ecu software :) I’ve learnt a bit about Efi tuning recently and the crux of it is a that EFI tuning is not magic - it is most definitely a science that everyone can learn

I’ll get some other injectors that have a bit more flow or perhaps just bump up the base fuel pressure if I notice that the injectors are at 100% duty cycle ;)

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-1968 Morris Mini 850-


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2020 8:13 pm 
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Back to basics.

Checked compression this week. Each cylinder hovering around 130PSI although I expect the actual compression to be slightly higher as the compression tester that I was using had a pretty long rubber hose on it.

Earth. The earth cable from the battery was looking a bit shabby so I made up a replacement with some better cable. I double checked my earth in the engine bay where my ECU, Coils and engine earth strap meet. Cleaned up everything making sure there was no excess paint, some new star washers, cleaned up the bolts on the wire wheel assembled with some WD40. No change - still not starting

Base timing. Checked this and every coil trigger with the timing light referencing the crank (for cyl 1 only) and the intake cam timing marks. Every coil being triggered at the right time. I changed the cam timing as mentioned above. 1.5mm lift on the intake valve and 1.8mm on the exhaust valve. This was a huge difference to what it was set at (roughly 3mm maybe more on both intake and exhaust)

Coils - suspected that the non genuine coils were an issue with inconsistent spark. Given that I paid $65 for 4 and the genuine ones are $100 each, I opted for genuine ones. These turned out to be much heavier and had much more solid connectors. Still no change - wouldn't start.

Fuel. Starter fluid down the intake to see if this was a fuel problem. Turned the key and it kicked over very confidently. A couple more attempts and slowly increasing the Fuel Prime Pulse and the Cranking Fuel delivery saw it start and run on it's own steam. You were right, Steve. It most definitely was a fueling issue that with some adjustment to necessary areas of the map got it sorted!! The idle was way too high and was running at around 2800rpm as I hadn't reset the idle since playing with the cam timing. Temperature was happy at around and no hotter than 85*C - very happy with that. One minor oil leak from one of the oil return lines at the back of the block. Might have to nip up those fittings.

All in all I am very pleased as it managed to start pretty consistently in the 30 odd minutes I played around with it this afternoon. The dashboard worked and oil pressure was sitting bang in the middle of the gauge. Next is setting the idle and playing with the base fuel tune before getting it on the street for some road tuning.

Thanks everyone for their help and input - I really appreciate all of the support I've received through this forum and in the private messages - you're all legends. Once I've got it running a little more smooth, I'll put some videos up.

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-1976 Yellow Devil Leyland Clubman-
-1968 Morris Mini 850-


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2020 6:35 pm 
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Today was cool - first few laps of the block under its own 1380, BMW K1200 Twin Cam, individual throttle body, multi-point injected steam after 3 and a bit years in the making.

The goal of the day was to tune what I could in the base fuel map while parked in the driveway. You can't access too many areas of a TPS vs RPM table while sitting under no load in the driveway but it did give some vague idea of what the map was going to look like. The aim was for a 14.7 AFR up until roughly 65% throttle where it starts to richen up. Despite having to employ some fans to keep the temps down while revving it up in the driveway, it went pretty well I'd say.

As for ignition timing - I downloaded a map from Specialist Components to give me an idea of what the ignition timing was doing on an engine setup that I know has been subject to a lot of R&D. Noting the differences between my TPS and the one used by SC, I only used it as a very very rough guide. For me - this correlated to timing around 8* at idle, to no greater than 15* beyond 15% throttle position. This is pretty conservative to ensure no detonation was occurring but Ive still got a bit of learning to do on how Ignition timing can be tuned on the road (I will probably end up taking the car to a dyno to optimise the base ignition timing so we can see what the output torque is doing as timing is advanced while also listening for knock to ensure it's safe). Looking at the SC base ignition map, it goes up to 45* advance in some of the higher end areas so 15* was definitely conservative enough to keep what i wanted to do safe for the purpose of tuning fuel.

Anyway - I was happy with the base fuel (or what i could fiddle with in the driveway) to the point I was keen to take it for a few laps of the block to explore some different areas of the map. Took a few laps of the driveway first to get used to the new clutch but it's perfect for this setup. Going around the block was awesome noting all the challenges of this build. It was very responsive although there were a few coughs and splutters when changing gear and getting back on the throttle pedal. Need to figure out what's going on here - I think over fueling...

I logged the data on the ECU to see what was happening post drive and made some changes to keep the AFR on track.

Unfortunately I found oil leaks that need some attention. Both cam gear rotating shaft seals are seeping and the oil return block has a leak which I cannot accurately pinpoint just yet. Either way, radiator back out and timing belt off to fix the oil seals. I suspect I didn't make sure that they were concentric before bolting down the cam plate. Easy fix - we'll get there.

Despite the oil leaks it's safe to say that I was pretty stoked today. The gearbox felt awesome and tight, no crunching gears and no concerning knocks bangs or squeaks. It's come a long way and I've learnt a lot to get to this point. Still a long way to go!!

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-1976 Yellow Devil Leyland Clubman-
-1968 Morris Mini 850-


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2020 7:29 pm 
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One tip regarding timing - if you've got a modern car with an OBD2 port, you can get a dongle and connect to your phone via an app. On mine I can check the timing vs RPM & load. It gives you a good idea of where to start

Mine goes up over 50 degrees of timing under part throttle coasting

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