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PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 6:43 pm 
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848cc
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Joined: Sun Sep 15, 2013 9:11 pm
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Location: Western Australia
This has been done a bazillion times before but I have a camera I enjoy using and I'm hoping to do this step by step. So, with a 1128 gearbox, an 1100 block, and a 202 head on the way, I've decided to kick this one off. Don't be checking back every five minutes though, I'm not exactly a fast worker.

The plan is to warm the head, throw in a mild cam, use the twin 1-1/4" SU's in the shed, and find an exhaust to give me that barking cooper sound. But those are the easy bits.

First off, the gearbox: I have access to a great workshop and I shall throw the complete box straight into the parts washer before disassembly. The box is an unknown quantity and knowing my luck, will need a load of new parts before reassembly. I'm not exactly mechanically inept but I've never done one of these before so I'll be asking questions along the way. In fact, can anyone here tell me anything I should be looking out for before and during tear-down? I don't want to be saying, "Gee, was that ball spring-loaded? Where could that have gone..." :(

I'm determined to make this old car drivable.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 7:35 pm 
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848cc
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Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 9:08 pm
Posts: 103
Location: Cockatoo, Victoria
Hi Flash, I found this link quite interesting about gearbox rebuilds. I haven't got there myself yet, but will be eventually. Worth a look in my humble opinion.

http://www.minimania.com/Classic_Mini_G ... ania_Video

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Current 1970 Mini K - full resto happening

Mini History
1963 - 850 - wish I still had it
1965 - 850 - was an unfinished project, gone
1972 - Clubbie, was my daily driver, first registered the day I was born, went to god.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 9:23 pm 
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1098cc
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Joined: Wed Jun 26, 2013 10:05 pm
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Location: perth WA
Organisation is the main thing flash. Keep your parts organised in plastic parts boxes. If its going to be a while before you rebuild it take photos. Get a workshop manual and read and understand before you start. Things like detent balls and springs can disappear without you even seeing them..

There is plenty of knowledge here as you know.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 9:43 pm 
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848cc
848cc

Joined: Sun Sep 15, 2013 9:11 pm
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Location: Western Australia
pturnedge wrote:
Hi Flash, I found this link quite interesting about gearbox rebuilds. I haven't got there myself yet, but will be eventually. Worth a look in my humble opinion.

http://www.minimania.com/Classic_Mini_G ... ania_Video


That's a great place to view them. I saw these on Youtube but you can never find them when you go back to review.

boomini wrote:
Organisation is the main thing flash. Keep your parts organised in plastic parts boxes. If its going to be a while before you rebuild it take photos. Get a workshop manual and read and understand before you start. Things like detent balls and springs can disappear without you even seeing them..

There is plenty of knowledge here as you know.


I've done motorcycle gearboxes before and I usually stack all the parts in order on a piece of broomstick (something like a kitchen roll holder), or a wooden rod with slabs of cardboard in between each part, so they don't get mixed up. My biggest issue here is being able to tell what's serviceable and what needs to be tossed. I will be swapping out all bearings etc though.

You are right though, there is loads of good info here. :D

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 12:02 am 
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848cc
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Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 3:20 pm
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Location: Australia, Rockhampton
Ill be following this closly as tomorrow ill be removing the gearbox off my 1100 and rebuilding it. Please keep us posted and any little tricks you find


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 12:29 am 
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848cc
848cc

Joined: Sun Sep 15, 2013 9:11 pm
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Location: Western Australia
This link is good for the early gearbox.

I was wondering if it was possible to use the A+ gears and in this one he shows us how. He's also not scared to use punches when installing bearings where I would usually use a tube but he's probably done a few more of these than me.

miniRock wrote:
Ill be following this closly as tomorrow ill be removing the gearbox off my 1100 and rebuilding it. Please keep us posted and any little tricks you find


You'll probably be finished way faster than me. I don't get much time to do this after work as I don't want to get home too late.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 9:00 am 
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1098cc
1098cc

Joined: Fri Dec 27, 2013 12:24 pm
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Location: Perth WA
Flash wrote:
He's also not scared to use punches when installing bearings where I would usually use a tube but he's probably done a few more of these than me.


I'm with you Flash using a punch is just showing off!! I've always used the old bearing against the new bearing and then a tube.

I'll be watching this thread closely as I am now very close to sourcing a 1275 and shall be going through the same process as you (probably even slower tho!)


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:11 pm 
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1275cc
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I'm looking at doing something similar in the next year or so, it'll be good to see how you go with it

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 8:52 pm 
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848cc
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Location: Western Australia
Okay, I had a look at the two blocks I have. The one on the gearbox is as it left the factory but with rust in the No.4 bore. It's so bad, it won't turn over. The other looks good but is already 60 thou over.

Again, this is all low cost and until about an hour ago, I was going to throw them both in the scrap bin (too hard basket) at work but then I got to thinking, "How deep can rust go in a block?" 20 thou, 40 thou? Whatever engine I use will probably receive an overbore anyway so is it worth looking at the rusty one?

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 1:47 pm 
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Location: near Baulkham Hills, NSW
I'd bore the rusty one to +.080" or +.100"... 8)
Use flat top pistons if you can get them.

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DrMini- 1970 wasaMatic 1360, Mk1S crank, 86.6HP (ATW) =~125 @ crank @7000+, 45 Dellorto, RE282 sprint cam, 1.5 rockers, 11.0:1 C/R. Going harder with Stealth Black Box in.:mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 3:31 pm 
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848cc
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Location: Western Australia
Too much power is never enough with you lot, huh? :D

It helps if you don't measure bores in the dark. The good spare block is in fact .030" over. Unless something like a 1275 comes along before I finish the gearbox, this will be the block I use. Would flat-top pistons really be necessary? This will be my daily hack.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:36 pm 
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Location: near Baulkham Hills, NSW
Flash wrote:
Too much power is never enough with you lot, huh? :D

It helps if you don't measure bores in the dark. The good spare block is in fact .030" over. Unless something like a 1275 comes along before I finish the gearbox, this will be the block I use. Would flat-top pistons really be necessary? This will be my daily hack.


Well if you run flat tops you can use a 12G295 Cooper/Sprite head, or open the chambers up on a 202 so it breathes better.
But if staying near stock with a 998 or 1098 head, dished ones are fine.

[Dished pistons + a 295 head = ~7.5:1 C/R, is stupidly low, because of the BIG head chambers. Flat top pistons help avoid this].

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DrMini- 1970 wasaMatic 1360, Mk1S crank, 86.6HP (ATW) =~125 @ crank @7000+, 45 Dellorto, RE282 sprint cam, 1.5 rockers, 11.0:1 C/R. Going harder with Stealth Black Box in.:mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:51 pm 
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848cc
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Joined: Sun Sep 15, 2013 9:11 pm
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Location: Western Australia
drmini in aust wrote:
[Dished pistons + a 295 head = ~7.5:1 C/R, is stupidly low, because of the BIG head chambers. Flat top pistons help avoid this].


I see your point.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:55 pm 
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848cc
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Joined: Tue Mar 12, 2013 3:20 pm
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Location: Australia, Rockhampton
Although a low CR opens the door to a supercharger if im correct


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 9:03 pm 
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1098cc
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Joined: Wed Jun 26, 2013 10:05 pm
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Location: perth WA
Yes supercharge that 1100 I say

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The best part of fixing your mini is the test drive

Minis..

1976 van daily drive
1975 van
1968 deluxe in the shed
1967 deluxe high strung 1310
1959 austin healey sprite


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