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PostPosted: Sun Sep 11, 2022 8:21 pm 
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998cc
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Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2004 5:58 pm
Posts: 633
Location: North Brisbane
I am in the market for a new electronic distributor. I have done a bunch of reading, asked on socials as well as my local mini expert.

Funnily enough, everyone has an opinion. :lol:

123 seems to be most popular response, i've read that CSI curves work better with a 1098..

I have already reach out to Lindsay about making a dizzy - sadly he isn't doing them anymore.

I'm keen to hear any recommendations and actual experience from people using any of the above mentioned dizzys in a warm 1098.

Thanks all.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2022 9:52 pm 
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848cc
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Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2017 7:09 pm
Posts: 62
Location: Sth of Ipswich in the Scenic Rim
Earlier in the year I purchased a CSI to replace the 29D in my 69MK2S. The 29D was still performing reliably, however the springs may have been stuffed as I was getting excessive advance. Over 40 degrees BTDC once over 3000rpm. Went like a scolded cat, but pinged heavily under load. I seriously looked at a Peak distributor from Lindsay Seibler, but I am a tinkerer and love tuning my cars on a deserted section of road. I liked the idea of trying different ignition curves.
I also considered a 123, however when I contacted 123, they would not supply the advance curves. The CSI curves for both the std CSI and the Swiftune CSI curves are readily available on the internet. I liked the std CSI curves as they covered a wider range. I thought the Swiftune curves were possibly more for tuned and race engines.

The CSI arrived with a small chunk out of the housing where it is sits in the bracket. To me it looked like it had been dropped. Advised Mini Spares UK and they noted for future reference if required. When I first fitted the CSI, it did not set up as per the instructions. Rather than turn to the right to get the 10degrees static timing, it needed to be turned to the left. Tried a second time and it achieved the static advance as per the instructions. The car started well, ran well on curves 9 to 11.
One day the car was hard to start. Eventually started and I thought nothing more of it. About a week later, the car would not start. No spark whatsoever. Contacted Mini Spares and CSI and they were very helpfull suggesting different things to try. CSI advised the chunk out of the housing was simply a casting issue and was found on the model that I purchased. I tried various things. In the end I found that it only worked if the bracket holding the dizzy was not tightened up. There was probably a loose connection somewhere in the shaft. Anyway. I sent it back to Mini Spares and they refunded me in full as well as the postage fees. I really wanted to try different CSI curves with static base timing of 12/13 degrees BTDC, but was denied the opportunity.

Again, I knew I should have bought a Peak from Lindsay, but the tinkerer in me got me buying a 123. Before I purchased the 123, I ended up finding the advance curves on the Australian 123 distributor website. One thing I liked was the 123 curves peaked at 5000rpm, whereas the CSI curves mostly all peaked at 6000rpm.

The CSI looks more standard with its cast housing. The 123 is all stainless steel and appears to be well built. I have been trialing the 123 for over 3 months and it has not missed a beat. I started on Curve C, then D and E. Curve D gave me the best timing results from 3000 to 5000rpm in top gear. Curve D is best for me, which has static base timing of 10 degrees BTDC, 20.4 at 2000rpm, total advance of 34 degrees at 5000rpm. I am currently running Curve 9 with 12 degrees base timing which gives me 20.1 degrees at 2000rpm and a total of 34 at 5000rpm. To date I am very pleased with the performance and have not heard any pinging.

There are several other curves that I want to try in the future. e.g. Curve 5 with 13 degrees static base timing. Curve 4 with 14 degrees base static timing. My car seems to like just over 20 degrees BTDC at 2000 rpm and ramping up to 32/34 BTDC as quickly as possible.

As others on this forum have previously suggested, if you buy these adjustable types of distributor, you really need access to a dyno or a rolling road to get the maximum out of your investment. Myself, I like the idea of tuning on the open road. I am lucky. Living in rural SE Qld, I am only 5 to 10 minutes away from a nice section of quiet country road, where I can play around as much as I like. I tune my carbs the same way and have done so over the years with my mini's and XU1's.

If you are a tinkerer like me or have access to a dyno, then I would certainly recommend a 123. I am sure there are others on the forum that could advise about an Aldon.

Regards Jon


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2022 8:44 pm 
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848cc
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Joined: Mon Apr 25, 2022 6:38 pm
Posts: 15
Location: Launceston - Tasmania
Fritzie wrote:
Earlier in the year I purchased a CSI to replace the 29D in my 69MK2S. The 29D was still performing reliably, however the springs may have been stuffed as I was getting excessive advance. Over 40 degrees BTDC once over 3000rpm. Went like a scolded cat, but pinged heavily under load. I seriously looked at a Peak distributor from Lindsay Seibler, but I am a tinkerer and love tuning my cars on a deserted section of road. I liked the idea of trying different ignition curves.
I also considered a 123, however when I contacted 123, they would not supply the advance curves. The CSI curves for both the std CSI and the Swiftune CSI curves are readily available on the internet. I liked the std CSI curves as they covered a wider range. I thought the Swiftune curves were possibly more for tuned and race engines.

The CSI arrived with a small chunk out of the housing where it is sits in the bracket. To me it looked like it had been dropped. Advised Mini Spares UK and they noted for future reference if required. When I first fitted the CSI, it did not set up as per the instructions. Rather than turn to the right to get the 10degrees static timing, it needed to be turned to the left. Tried a second time and it achieved the static advance as per the instructions. The car started well, ran well on curves 9 to 11.
One day the car was hard to start. Eventually started and I thought nothing more of it. About a week later, the car would not start. No spark whatsoever. Contacted Mini Spares and CSI and they were very helpfull suggesting different things to try. CSI advised the chunk out of the housing was simply a casting issue and was found on the model that I purchased. I tried various things. In the end I found that it only worked if the bracket holding the dizzy was not tightened up. There was probably a loose connection somewhere in the shaft. Anyway. I sent it back to Mini Spares and they refunded me in full as well as the postage fees. I really wanted to try different CSI curves with static base timing of 12/13 degrees BTDC, but was denied the opportunity.

Again, I knew I should have bought a Peak from Lindsay, but the tinkerer in me got me buying a 123. Before I purchased the 123, I ended up finding the advance curves on the Australian 123 distributor website. One thing I liked was the 123 curves peaked at 5000rpm, whereas the CSI curves mostly all peaked at 6000rpm.

The CSI looks more standard with its cast housing. The 123 is all stainless steel and appears to be well built. I have been trialing the 123 for over 3 months and it has not missed a beat. I started on Curve C, then D and E. Curve D gave me the best timing results from 3000 to 5000rpm in top gear. Curve D is best for me, which has static base timing of 10 degrees BTDC, 20.4 at 2000rpm, total advance of 34 degrees at 5000rpm. I am currently running Curve 9 with 12 degrees base timing which gives me 20.1 degrees at 2000rpm and a total of 34 at 5000rpm. To date I am very pleased with the performance and have not heard any pinging.

There are several other curves that I want to try in the future. e.g. Curve 5 with 13 degrees static base timing. Curve 4 with 14 degrees base static timing. My car seems to like just over 20 degrees BTDC at 2000 rpm and ramping up to 32/34 BTDC as quickly as possible.

As others on this forum have previously suggested, if you buy these adjustable types of distributor, you really need access to a dyno or a rolling road to get the maximum out of your investment. Myself, I like the idea of tuning on the open road. I am lucky. Living in rural SE Qld, I am only 5 to 10 minutes away from a nice section of quiet country road, where I can play around as much as I like. I tune my carbs the same way and have done so over the years with my mini's and XU1's.

If you are a tinkerer like me or have access to a dyno, then I would certainly recommend a 123. I am sure there are others on the forum that could advise about an Aldon.

Regards Jon


Great write up, thank you

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2022 1:13 pm 
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998cc
998cc
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Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2004 5:58 pm
Posts: 633
Location: North Brisbane
Fritzie wrote:
Earlier in the year I purchased a CSI to replace the 29D in my 69MK2S. The 29D was still performing reliably, however the springs may have been stuffed as I was getting excessive advance. Over 40 degrees BTDC once over 3000rpm. Went like a scolded cat, but pinged heavily under load. I seriously looked at a Peak distributor from Lindsay Seibler, but I am a tinkerer and love tuning my cars on a deserted section of road. I liked the idea of trying different ignition curves.
I also considered a 123, however when I contacted 123, they would not supply the advance curves. The CSI curves for both the std CSI and the Swiftune CSI curves are readily available on the internet. I liked the std CSI curves as they covered a wider range. I thought the Swiftune curves were possibly more for tuned and race engines.

The CSI arrived with a small chunk out of the housing where it is sits in the bracket. To me it looked like it had been dropped. Advised Mini Spares UK and they noted for future reference if required. When I first fitted the CSI, it did not set up as per the instructions. Rather than turn to the right to get the 10degrees static timing, it needed to be turned to the left. Tried a second time and it achieved the static advance as per the instructions. The car started well, ran well on curves 9 to 11.
One day the car was hard to start. Eventually started and I thought nothing more of it. About a week later, the car would not start. No spark whatsoever. Contacted Mini Spares and CSI and they were very helpfull suggesting different things to try. CSI advised the chunk out of the housing was simply a casting issue and was found on the model that I purchased. I tried various things. In the end I found that it only worked if the bracket holding the dizzy was not tightened up. There was probably a loose connection somewhere in the shaft. Anyway. I sent it back to Mini Spares and they refunded me in full as well as the postage fees. I really wanted to try different CSI curves with static base timing of 12/13 degrees BTDC, but was denied the opportunity.

Again, I knew I should have bought a Peak from Lindsay, but the tinkerer in me got me buying a 123. Before I purchased the 123, I ended up finding the advance curves on the Australian 123 distributor website. One thing I liked was the 123 curves peaked at 5000rpm, whereas the CSI curves mostly all peaked at 6000rpm.

The CSI looks more standard with its cast housing. The 123 is all stainless steel and appears to be well built. I have been trialing the 123 for over 3 months and it has not missed a beat. I started on Curve C, then D and E. Curve D gave me the best timing results from 3000 to 5000rpm in top gear. Curve D is best for me, which has static base timing of 10 degrees BTDC, 20.4 at 2000rpm, total advance of 34 degrees at 5000rpm. I am currently running Curve 9 with 12 degrees base timing which gives me 20.1 degrees at 2000rpm and a total of 34 at 5000rpm. To date I am very pleased with the performance and have not heard any pinging.

There are several other curves that I want to try in the future. e.g. Curve 5 with 13 degrees static base timing. Curve 4 with 14 degrees base static timing. My car seems to like just over 20 degrees BTDC at 2000 rpm and ramping up to 32/34 BTDC as quickly as possible.

As others on this forum have previously suggested, if you buy these adjustable types of distributor, you really need access to a dyno or a rolling road to get the maximum out of your investment. Myself, I like the idea of tuning on the open road. I am lucky. Living in rural SE Qld, I am only 5 to 10 minutes away from a nice section of quiet country road, where I can play around as much as I like. I tune my carbs the same way and have done so over the years with my mini's and XU1's.

If you are a tinkerer like me or have access to a dyno, then I would certainly recommend a 123. I am sure there are others on the forum that could advise about an Aldon.

Regards Jon



Brilliant rite up, thanks mate..

I ended up ordering a CSI Vac Adv. distributor based on a few factors.

I prefer the more standard look of the CSI over the 123.
CSI uses standard cap and button rather than brand specific.
My local mini specialist who will be tuning the car highly recommended the CSI.

I guess only time will tell if this was the correct choice considering majority of people suggested the 123. I'm sure it will be better than the 2 s/h dizzies I have had in it until this point.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2022 5:46 am 
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848cc
848cc

Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2017 7:09 pm
Posts: 62
Location: Sth of Ipswich in the Scenic Rim
You are right, the CSI is better suited for a more original look. It is also easier to install than the 123 as the section which mounts into the bracket is very close to the main body of the distributor, very close. I ended up cutting a 7/16" open end spanner in half to get access to the bolt on the LHS.

I am sure you will enjoy the CSI. I was probably just unlucky to get a dud one.

Good time to be buying one from UK with the very low value of the English Pound at present.

Regards Jon


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